Graham on January 19th, 2017

This goes along with my posting from last week

From the Niagara Falls Review:

The former Niagara Falls Memorial Arena could be demolished and replaced with a museum dedicated to — and modeled after — the Titanic.

The city’s committee of adjustment approved an application from businessman David van Velzen this week for minor variances to a bylaw that would allow for a new facility to be built in the shape of the historic British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in 1912 after colliding with an iceberg.

The Centre Street building, which most recently housed a sand sculpture attraction, was put up for sale in November 2014.

Graham on January 19th, 2017

From the Buffalo News (including several beautiful pictures):

Even Tesla was freezing.

That is one image that sticks with me after the overwhelming experience of seeing Niagara Falls in winter. You know that oversized, Soviet-style statue of Nikola Tesla that sits on Stedman’s Bluff, overlooking the American Falls? The great scientist sat hunkered down, the blueprints in his lap covered in snow and ice, and you could swear he was shivering.

Not to sound like your mother, Nikola, but you shouldn’t go anywhere near Niagara Falls in winter without the proper attire.

I learned that the hard way.

Graham on January 19th, 2017

From WGRZ Channel 2 in Buffalo:

For the first time in a very long time, there are signs of life in downtown Niagara Falls.

On Rainbow Boulevard, construction crews have been working around the clock to build Mark Hamister’s $35 million Hyatt Place hotel, set to open later this year. The world-famous Rainforest Café opened on Old Falls Street in 2015, and a few years before that, the downtown corridor welcomed the launch of the Niagara Falls Culinary Institute. The Robert Moses Parkway, with its prime riverfront location, will be more accessible due to a reconfiguration project funded through the state’s Buffalo Billion investment program.

In his State of the State speech last week at the University at Buffalo, Gov. Cuomo credited the state’s Buffalo Billion investment for creating $200 million in additional private-sector investment.

Then, as he unveiled the second phase of the Buffalo Billion, the governor announced a proposal for even more state investment.

“We’ll acquire underutilized property in downtown Niagara Falls,” Cuomo said. “So we can free up that land that has been locked up for too long and actually have productive commercial activity developed on it that capitalizes on the growth.”

Last week I received the following press release from the Niagara Falls History Museum:

For Immediate Release

Prediction: SNOW from January to April at
Niagara Falls History Museum

Niagara Falls, ON, January 13, 2016 – Canadians have a long-standing fascination with snow.  We either love it or hate it, and sometimes we do both.  We adapt to it, use it, have fun with it, identify with it, and are inspired by it.  Snow is an interactive exhibition opening at the Niagara Falls History Museum on January 26, 2017.

Snow, the first exhibition of its kind in Canada, portrays the amazing love-hate relationship that the inhabitants of this great land have had with snow since the arrival of the First Peoples in North America. Created by the Canadian Museum of History in partnership with the J. Armand Bombardier Museum, Snow gives visitors a historical and cultural perspective on this element of nature as a source of adaptation, passion, ingenuity and creativity.

With over 400 digital photos and captions contributed by Canadians from across the country, Snow gives visitors a true feel for winter.  Snow presents artefacts such as boots made out of sealskin and caribou hide, snowshoes and clothing designed to be warm and waterproof.   Eyeglasses made from walrus ivory by Nunavut’s Thule Inuit that date back to around 1300 are among the items on display.   Visitors young and old can try on replicas of the glasses and see some of the clever ways in which humans have adapted to snow and cold.  Among the exhibition’s interactives are opportunities to try on a snowshoeing outfit, listen to recorded stories and view sketches made by explorers, voyageurs, soldiers and scientists, to learn how Canada’s early settlers endured and adapted to the winter months.

“Weather is a favourite topic for Canadians,” says Suzanne Moase, Niagara Falls Museums Curator.  “We love to talk about snowstorms, the cold and the slush.  Snow, the exhibition, will strike a chord with all our visitors, from outdoor enthusiasts to sitters by the fire and everyone in between.  The artefacts and documents chosen represent how we deal with the challenge of snowy winters today, as well as how we have coped with snow and adapted our lifestyles around it in the past.”

Media are invited to preview the exhibition on January 25 from 5:00 p.m until 7:00 p.m. where Museum staff and Mr. Nicolas Gauvin, Director of Business Partnerships and Information Management at the Canadian Museum of History will be available for comments.

Snow falls on the Niagara Falls History Museum, 5810 Ferry Street, Niagara Falls, on January 26 and “blankets” the Ontario Power Generation Gallery until April 16, 2017.  Come and see how snow has helped shape our cultural identity.  You’ll be “snowed” under.

-30-

For more information, contact:

Clark Bernat, City of Niagara Falls
Manager of Museums and Culture

Phone: 905-358-5082
Email: cbernat@niagarafalls.ca

From Le Parisien:

Découvrir les Chutes du Niagara sous un autre angle.

On connaît l’image des Chutes du Niagara, ces impressionnants murs d’eau en forme de fer à cheval où la rivière Niagara effectue un saut de 51 mètres dans le vide. C’est en été que le spectacle est le plus impressionnant. Mais on oublie souvent que le site est tout aussi magique en hiver. Au plus fort de l’hiver, les chutes deviennent des sculptures de glace que l’on peut admirer jusqu’au dégel.

Translation courtesy of Google Translate:

Discover the Niagara Falls from a different angle.

We know the image of Niagara Falls, the impressive horseshoe-shaped water walls where the Niagara River jumps 51 meters in a vacuum. It is in summer that the show is most impressive. But we often forget that the site is just as magical in winter. At the height of winter, the falls become sculptures of ice that can be admired until the thaw.

Graham on January 17th, 2017

From the Norwalk Reflector:

A Norwalk native and her husband received an unpleasant surprise when they visited Niagara Falls.

Jill (Morr) Spildener, along with her husband, Jamie, visited the Falls area on Friday. The Berea couple parked on the American side, walked across Rainbow Bridge to Canada, and then made their way down toward Horseshoe Falls on foot.

Upon arrival, tourists were abuzz about something that just happened and police were at the scene.

“Approximately five minutes before we arrived at the Horseshoe Falls, a middle-aged man was seen floating face up in the river and went over the falls,” Spildener said. “He was conscious and coherent because he was looking at onlookers as he went by and said something just before he disappeared from view. No one was able to make out what he said.

Graham on January 17th, 2017

From Niagara This Week:

For a pair of local youngsters, it was a chance to hang for a few minutes with Katy Perry — at least a wax rendition of the pop singer anyway.

“Everything!” Brooke Annette said when asked what she liked about the annual Museums Dollar Day for Cystic Fibrosis.

“Everything is great,” sister Caitlin added.

The Annette girls’ excitement was music to Nancy Clayton’s ears. The vice-president of the Niagara Chapter of Cystic Fibrosis is the organizer of the annual fundraiser, which allows residents entrance to a selection of museums and attractions in the Clifton Hill area for just a loonie.

“There’s so many happy families, so many happy kids,” Clayton said as she watched visitors take in displays at the Movieland Wax Museum, one of the most popular sites to visit Sunday afternoon, it seemed. Lineups were long, but were constantly moving.

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