Tag: horseshoe falls

HIGGS: Early tourism took visitors below and behind the falls

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From the Niagara Gazette:

Since Franciscan monk and explorer Louis Hennepin became the first European to encounter the “Falls at Niagara” in 1658 we could call him the first “tourist,” but let’s start in the early 19th century. We will begin around the time of the construction of the Erie Canal on July 4, 1817 in Rome, New York, which opened the door to travel (and commerce) across the state of New York. Read More…

Niagara Falls to be Illuminated – Tuesday, February 14th – in Pink and Red In Celebration of Valentine’s Day

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From Niagara at Large:

Niagara Falls will be bathed in soft pink and red lights this Valentine’s Day, providing the perfect backdrop to celebrate this romantic evening.
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Explore New York State: Spots that will take your breath away

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From Newsday:

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that Long Island and New York City make up only a tiny fraction of the state we call home.

Sure, the city has impressive views and lovely parks and Long Island’s got some great beaches, but its the rest of New York that will take your breath away.

Head north for incredible mountain ranges; west for spectacular waterfalls and gorges; east for bluffs overlooking the ocean…

Straddling the border between the U.S. and Canada, Niagara Falls actually consists of three waterfalls: Horseshoe, American and Bridal Veil. While not quite as tall as some other falls around the world, it’s the volume of water that make these drops so spectacular. More than 6 million cubic feet of water per minute flow over the crests at peak time.Take advantage of the trip way up here (about 400 miles from Manhattan) and explore nearby Buffalo.

1969: Niagara Falls runs dry

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From Mashable.com:

For several months in 1969, the torrent of water rushing over American Falls, one of three waterfalls that makes up Niagara Falls, was reduced to little more than a trickle.
American Falls is recognizable for the immense rock pile, or talus, at its base, the result of a series of natural rockslides over the years. In the late 1960s, concerns were growing that further rockslides could erode the falls completely.
To study the geological composition of the falls and forestall their potential destruction, a joint American-Canadian commission decided to dewater them for five months.
Over three days in June 1969, more than 1,200 trucks dumped nearly 28,000 tons of rocky fill into a cofferdam upstream of the falls, diverting the flow of the Niagara River away from American Falls and toward the much larger Horseshoe Falls.
With the falls dry for the first time in millennia, the US Army Corps of Engineers began their investigation.

Le visage caché des Chutes du Niagara (The Hidden Face of Niagara Falls)

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From Le Parisien:

Découvrir les Chutes du Niagara sous un autre angle.

On connaît l’image des Chutes du Niagara, ces impressionnants murs d’eau en forme de fer à cheval où la rivière Niagara effectue un saut de 51 mètres dans le vide. C’est en été que le spectacle est le plus impressionnant. Mais on oublie souvent que le site est tout aussi magique en hiver. Au plus fort de l’hiver, les chutes deviennent des sculptures de glace que l’on peut admirer jusqu’au dégel.

Translation courtesy of Google Translate:

Discover the Niagara Falls from a different angle.

We know the image of Niagara Falls, the impressive horseshoe-shaped water walls where the Niagara River jumps 51 meters in a vacuum. It is in summer that the show is most impressive. But we often forget that the site is just as magical in winter. At the height of winter, the falls become sculptures of ice that can be admired until the thaw.

Man goes over Niagara Falls as tourists look on

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From the Norwalk Reflector:

A Norwalk native and her husband received an unpleasant surprise when they visited Niagara Falls.

Jill (Morr) Spildener, along with her husband, Jamie, visited the Falls area on Friday. The Berea couple parked on the American side, walked across Rainbow Bridge to Canada, and then made their way down toward Horseshoe Falls on foot.

Upon arrival, tourists were abuzz about something that just happened and police were at the scene.

“Approximately five minutes before we arrived at the Horseshoe Falls, a middle-aged man was seen floating face up in the river and went over the falls,” Spildener said. “He was conscious and coherent because he was looking at onlookers as he went by and said something just before he disappeared from view. No one was able to make out what he said.

In Focus: Niagara Falls Area, Ontario, Canada

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From HospitalityNet:

The city of Niagara Falls, Ontario, is on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls, which forms the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the US state of New York. The natural wonder of Niagara Falls, which is the collective name for the Horseshoe Falls, the adjacent American Falls, and the smaller Bridal Veil Falls, is a major tourist attraction for the city of Niagara Falls, attracting 12 million visitors every year. Combined, the three falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world—and a vertical drop of more than 165 feet.

Top 10: the best Niagara Falls hotels

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From The Telegraph:

Spectacular and easy to get to, Niagara Falls have been a honeymoon destination since the 19th century. Nowadays, romance is matched by casinos, spas and family amusements. There are actually three falls, the Canadian Horseshoe, American and Bridal Veil Falls, and, as they straddle the US/Canada border, the question is: where to stay? The Ontario bank has the best views and offers much more for visitors, from helicopter rides and nearby vineyards to first-rate theatre in the pretty town of Niagara-on-the-Lake. Across in New York is the small, gritty city of Niagara, where the waterfalls and riverbank are protected by a state park.

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