Tag: niagara river

    On either side of Niagara Falls, when it rains, it pours sewage and stormwater

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    From the Buffalo News:

    An estimated 800 million gallons of untreated sewage and stormwater have flowed into the Niagara River from the American and Canadian sides so far this year, eight times more than last year.

    It’s enough to pour over the Horseshoe Falls for 20 minutes.

    The American side accounts for about three-quarters of the sewage and overflow, according to discharge data The Buffalo News reviewed. But most of the time, neither side’s wastewater system can handle an inch of daily rainfall without overflows into the river.

    Near Niagara Falls, a ‘secret’ bouldering spot grows in popularity

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    From the Globe and Mail:

    Not far from one of Ontario’s most famous sights – Niagara Falls, attracting 14 million visitors a year – is one of the province’s best-kept secrets: a hidden playground of large rock formations spread throughout the wooded trails of the Niagara Glen Nature Reserve, just above the rapid, cool water of the Niagara River.

    The Glen is known as a relaxing hideaway from the touristy crowds. What many people don’t know: It’s also the best outdoor bouldering spot Southern Ontario has to offer.

    If you haven’t heard of bouldering, it’s like rock climbing but without a rope. You climb up four or five metres instead of 20. You need a lot of body strength to do it, but it also picks your brain.

    The ‘Canada first’ legacy of John A. Macdonald

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    Not really an article specifically about Niagara Falls, but it does get mentioned…

    From the Hamilton Spectator:

    In light of the furor to remove John A. Macdonald’s name from public institutions and bar his visage from the public square, it might be prudent to relate this serendipitous anecdote from our city’s rich history…

    By the late 1870s The United States had begun its journey to create an imperialist state, cancelling the free trade treaty of the 1850s. “Reciprocity” had been a boon to Hamilton’s first mass transit enterprise, The Great Western Railway. Rail laying equipment, iron rails, steam-powered shovels and even locomotives had streamed across the recently built suspension Roebling bridge at Clifton Hill on the Niagara River, without interruption or inspection.

    Falls water board reports another sewer discharge

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    From the Niagara Falls Reporter:

    Another sewer discharge in the Niagara River has prompted a response from Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

    A notice issued Wednesday on the state’s NY Alert system indicated that the Niagara Falls Wastewater Treatment Plant released roughly 1.1 million gallons during a thunderstorm that occurred around 7 p.m. Tuesday. According to the notice, the release lasted about three hours.

    Indigenous music rumbles Falls

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    From the Niagara Falls Review:

    Across both sides of the river, drums played back and forth during the opening ceremony of Rumble at the Falls on Saturday night at Oakes Garden Theatre in Niagara Falls.

    Though they were tough to hear at some parts from the other side, during the swells of traditional Indigenous drums and singing, the message was clear across the Niagara River — Indigenous people are still here and still rocking today.

    Following the kickoff, the music was loud and spirits high as the sounds of rock and blues filled the air of Clifton Hill, featuring Indigenous musicians including two-time Juno Award winner Derek Miller.

    YESTERDAY AND TODAY: Bridging the Niagara Gorge

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    From the Niagara Falls Review:

    The first bridges across the Niagara River (first for pedestrians and carriages, later also allowing for railroad traffic) opened in the late 1840s and early 1850s. They were a good distance away from the Falls, crossing the Niagara Gorge where the CN crosses today at the eastern end of Bridge Street in Niagara Falls.

    The success of those first bridges in that area led to a desire to have similar bridges much closer to the Falls. So it was that in 1867 work began on the first bridge that would cross the Gorge further south, two miles closer to the Falls.

    That first Falls View bridge was a suspension bridge that lasted from 1867 to 1889. It was finally blown down in a storm in January 1889, but within five months it was replaced by a second Falls View suspension bridge.

    Cops: Too many boaters cruise into Niagara Falls danger zone

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    From Niagara This Week:

    An American police marine unit that patrols the upper Niagara River says too many boaters and people on personal watercraft are getting too close to the brink of Niagara Falls.

    New York State Park Police Lt. Clyde Doty tells WGRZ-TV in Buffalo (http://on.wgrz.com/2feIsBJ ) that people put their lives at risk when they ignore buoys and warning signs on the river.

    Cuomo orders probe of black water in Niagara Falls

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    From the Niagara Falls Review:

    New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he doesn’t believe a Niagara Falls, N.Y., agency’s claims surrounding wastewater discharges that turned the water near the base of Niagara’s falls black at the height of a busy tourist weekend.

    A day after directing state regulators to investigate, the Democrat told reporters Tuesday he believes there will be a criminal investigation because of the potential seriousness of the situation.

    He said he doesn’t believe the Niagara Falls Water Board’s statement the discharge from the local wastewater treatment plant was within permitted limits.

    Cuomo said Monday the expulsion of foul-smelling, black water into the Niagara River on Saturday may have violated state water quality standards.

    Shuttle ferries visitors from around the world to Niagara’s attractions

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    From the Buffalo News:

    Outside the arched windows of the Discover Niagara Shuttle, the sights passed by – the Rainbow Bridge, the quaint shops of Lewiston, the Power Vista, a living quilt stitched together by glimpses of the green water of the Niagara River.

    Inside the shuttle were people from all over the world.

    They gazed at the passing scene, studied the fold-out maps that outlined each stop on the shuttle route, or watched the screen in the front of the car, which played a video loop about the attractions and business partners.

    Since urban renewal ripped out the heart of downtown Niagara Falls in the 1970s, tourism experts have faced the challenge of keeping visitors for longer than the hours it takes to see the falls, ride the Maid of the Mist and maybe see the Cave of the Winds.

    A couple of random Niagara Falls articles

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    I get Google Alerts for things that pertain to Niagara Falls. Neither of these stories are particularly tourism-related, but were still interesting, so I figured I’d share them…

    Niagara Gazette – A daughter’s journey: Minnesota woman’s trek to Niagara Falls turns up gift of family she never knew

    Pam Edwards, a native of Grand Rapids, Minnesota, found answers she was seeking about her dead father when a friend used Ancestry.com to help her find uncles and extended family in the Niagara Region.

    Toronto Star – What I learned on my long, lovely limp along the Trans Canada Trail

    I walked the paved path through Queenston Heights along the edge of the gorge that drops to the frothing Niagara River. On this side was the Canada that Brock and his troops helped preserve; on the other was our leviathan neighbour.

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