Tag: motorists

    Border delays concern Niagara Falls councillor

    2 Comments

    From Niagara This Week:

    Wayne Thompson got a first-hand look Sunday at delays being experienced by motorists crossing into Canada at the Rainbow Bridge.

    “They were lined up for two, three blocks back on both sides,” Thomson said. “It was unbelievable.”

    While it took him just 20 minutes to cross into Niagara Falls, N.Y., he faced a 90-minute wait up his return to Canada.

    He said that while he holds a NEXUS card and normally would use the Whirpool Bridge to cross into Niagara Falls, N.Y., he was with his grandson, who isn’t a cardholder.

    “We had to drive over the Rainbow Bridge and it was loaded,” he said.

    Rough road ahead for Robert Moses?

    No Comments

    From the Niagara Gazette:

    More than 50 years ago, the Robert Moses Parkway served as a modern arterial shuttling motorists along the Niagara River offering sweeping views of the gorge rim and a direct road to the brink of the American Falls.

    It was built in a time when Niagara Falls was bustling, small villages and towns to the north were growing and residents desired direct routes to all points in between.

    However, in the years since a mounting charge has been led calling for change of the once iconic by-way — and now people are listening.

    Moses still on meandering detour

    No Comments

    From the Buffalo News:

    The Robert Moses State Parkway, hailed a half-century ago as a marvel of modern highway engineering that would give millions of motorists a new perspective of the Niagara River and its famous falls, may have become a road to oblivion.

    The objective was to provide a fast, efficient and safe way for people to drive rapidly along the river’s edge and enjoy its spectacular views without having to dodge pedestrians or worry about cross-street traffic.

    It was a way to open the river’s vistas to drivers and passengers who otherwise may never have been able to find a place to park, and it was free of charge.

    The idea of a limited-access, scenic parkway with wide, sweeping curves that wound right through the state park at the brink of the American Falls seemed like an idea whose time had come in the mid-20th century. And it was named in honor of the state’s master builder of the time: Robert Moses.

    But a growing chorus of detractors has formed over the last few decades calling for change — and in some cases demolition — of all or some of the parkway, and state officials again are considering what to do about it.

    Day of action sparks protest at Marineland

    No Comments

    From Niagara This Week:

    It was a mostly soggy Saturday morning and afternoon for the dozens of activists who stood just outside the Marineland property, seeking honks of support for their efforts to raise awareness for captive ocean animals.

    Lining up along Marineland Drive, the protestors held up a variety of large, handmade signs with provocative statements to catch the attention of passing motorists, as well as those heading into the amusement, which recently opened for the season.

    While many of those there were local, more than a few came from outside Niagara’s borders.

    Toronto’s Angela Salewsky said people need to realize how badly the animals are treated, despite what marine park owners say about providing them with 24-hour veterinarian care and an ample food supply.

    TABLE ROCK CHANGES HAVE IMPROVED SAFETY

    No Comments

    From the Niagara Falls Review:

    The gateway to Niagara Falls from the Falls Incline and parking lot has been at the same location for more than a quarter of a century.

    So what’s different now? Pedestrians are now delivered to the second floor of Table Rock, instead of the first floor.

    Why? For public safety and accessibility.

    Prior to the renovations, in order to gain access to Table Rock it was necessary to descend a flight of stairs or navigate a ramp that did not meet accessibility standards.

    This delivered you to the edge of a road which during the summer months carries as much traffic as any regional arterial road in Niagara and more than most.

    Motorists and pedestrians found the traffic signals in the area confusing. The mingling of tens of thousands of pedestrians and vehicles simply wasn’t safe by today’s standards.

    %d bloggers like this: