Tag: canadian

    Parks official resigns post in Canada

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    From the Buffalo News:

    Fay Booker, general manager of the Niagara Parks Commission, has resigned from the Canadian park agency.

    The reasons for Booker’s resignation are unclear, though a source familiar with the situation said tensions between the agency and the Niagara Falls, Ont., city government likely played a role.

    Before her hiring as general manager last summer, Booker served as chairwoman for the commission, which has garnered increased attention in recent months because of its decision to allow stuntman Nik Wallenda to walk on a tightrope above the falls and awarding a 30-year contract allowing Hornblower Cruises to run boat tours around the falls.

    “We will build on the foundation Ms. Booker helped to establish and continue moving in a new strategic direction to ensure a strong, sustainable future for the Niagara Parks Commission,” interim Parks Commission Chairwoman Janice Thomson said in a statement.

    Director Sobol brings it all back home, again

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    From the Niagara Falls Review:

    As tensions rise between the border guard and suspicious driver at the Rainbow Bridge, Jonathan Sobol can’t keep a straight face.

    He’s watching on a monitor ten feet away as the guard, played by Canadian comedian Mike Wilmott, asks the driver – actor Jay Baruchel – what’s in the trunk of his car. With every take, Baruchel changes his answer.

    “Smugglers,” he responds. “I am smuggling smugglers in my trunk.”

    It goes on for a half dozen takes, the crew smirking with each one, careful not to laugh and ruin the scene. Finally Sobol yells cut and everyone breaks for lunch. He asks Baruchel which take he liked best.

    “That’s up to you, dude,” he says.

    Sobol gives his star a hug, and all is well on the set of The Black Marks, the Niagara Falls director’s follow-up to his 2010 dark comedy A Beginner’s Guide to Endings, also filmed locally.

    Wallenda outlines plan for N Falls walk

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    From WIVB Channel 4 in Buffalo (including a video):

    Nik Wallenda presented new plans to the Niagara Parks Commission, this week.

    The proposal outlined his exact path across the falls. Still, he’s walking a fine line with the Canadians and some in Niagara Falls.

    Niagara Falls historian Paul Gromoziak said, “Oh my God, it’s ridiculous to even contemplate such a thing! Leave the falls alone! If you want to walk on a rope, go some place else.”

    Gromoziak is outraged over Wallenda’s proposed stunt. Wallenda wants to cross the falls, on a tight rope, no wider than a nickel. Gromoziak says the state has reneged on its promise to keep the falls “natural” consenting to Wallenda’s walk.

    “And now by permitting this, this stunt to be performed, in the park, it’s opening the flood gates, I think, to many things similar to that come,” argued Gromoziak.

    Niagara Falls is walking its own wire

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    From the Buffalo News:

    The Niagara Falls publicity stunt was born like this: It was September 1827.A group of hoteliers wanted to make a quick buck. So they sent an old lake schooner, filled with terrified animals, over the brink. The spectacle, as planned, drew thousands. Many of the animals died in the plunge.

    It’s 184 years later, and we’re still grasping at ghoulish curiosities at Niagara.

    Famed wire walker Nik Wallenda wants to cross the Horseshoe Falls on his tightrope, and debate over the planned escapade has dominated discussion on both sides of the famous falls for months.

    The stunt, already given the go-ahead by Albany, now hinges on a decision by the Canadians. But whether Wallenda walks or not is beside the point.

    Debate over the high-wire act is a distraction to the real problems that plague Niagara Falls. Blight, unemployment and a worn-out reputation for hucksterism overshadow a natural wonder that is still unique to the world.

    Great Experiences on Clifton Hill in Niagara Falls

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    The Clifton Hill blog has a nice write-up about a photographer from Holland who came and visited, along with some links to some great pictures. Check it out!

    A few weeks ago we were contacted by professional photographer Ken Cranney, who recently visited Niagara Falls with his wife Ina and son Riley. They traveled all the way from Holland and met up with some close friends, who drove in from New Jersey. Ken is actually a Canadian living in Holland while his wife and son are Dutch. They all converged on Clifton Hill’s World Famous Street of Fun by the Falls to kick off a fun filled weekend!

    The Traveling Camera: Niagra Falls

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    From The Source Weekly (including a nice picture):

    Niagara Falls is one of those places where you can forget its beauty because the falls are surrounded by cheesy attractions in Canada and by rather squalid urban areas on the American side. But the falls are still impressive.

    Bids received for boat tours below Falls

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    From the Buffalo News:

    A deadline to submit proposals to operate boat tours from the Canadian shore below Niagara Falls passed Monday, but the number of bidders and the names of companies that submitted proposals will remain secret for now.

    Niagara Parks Commission Chairwoman Fay Booker said the commission does not plan to release details about the proposals at least until after the commission has made its recommendation for what company should operate the tours.

    “Once we finish the evaluation process, we’ll probably be able to do a bit of a summary report in terms of how many bids came in and who the recommended proponent is,” Booker said.

    Just Another Travel Blog: Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

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    Someone with a Blogger blog posted about a recent trip to Niagara Falls:

    I had been to Niagara Falls over 20 years ago as a child with my parents. At the time, they seemed huge. Now, as an adult, they are beautiful and romantic, but not inspiring.

    It’s sad to see what much of the Canadian side has become. Clifton Hill and the surrounding area is block after block of bad fast food and souvenir shops. The quaint charm of most Canadian cities is given way to the worst forms of American Yankee commercialism. Forget romance. It’s sad really.

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