Tag: railing

More Niagara Speedway go-kart track railings and netting

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Based on the traffic I’ve gotten for some of my Niagara Speedway posts, it seems that many people are anxious to get more details about the go-kart track. I’m sorry to say that I have no information. There are no signs up and no indication of when it will open. All I can say is that there is still work being done.

I previously posted about some railings along the track. They’ve now put posts up all around the spiral, and have also put up some sort of mesh fence along parts of the track.

Niagara Speedway go-kart track progress update

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Now that many of the new operations on Clifton Hill/Victoria Avenue are open, I guess the next big thing is going to be the Niagara Speedway go-kart track. There used to be banners up on the fencing that showed that it was a go-kart track, but now it is just blank. I’ve actually had a few people ask me if it was a water slide.

There has been no official word on when it will open, but there still seems to be a lot of work to be done. However, they are still working and making progress. Yesterday I noticed that new red railing was up along the track.

‘Hero’ from famous Falls rescue turns 100

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From the Niagara Gazette:

When John R. Hayes Sr., 48, a visitor from New Jersey, spotted the crisis near Terrapin Point that day, July 9, 1960, he dashed to the railing — less than 200 feet from the brink of the Horseshoe Falls — and started shouting.

“Kick, girl! Kick your feet, come to me!” he screamed to Deanne Woodward, 17, tossing in the rapids above the 161-foot Horseshoe Falls. She had been riding in a boat with her brother, Roger Woodward, 7, and James Honeycutt, 42, who had taken the children on an outing for Deanne’s birthday. When their disabled craft drifted into the upper rapids, it soon capsized, spilling the trio into the unpredictable currents.

Lots of tourists were standing around that prime viewing area but only one — John Quattrochi of Penns Grove, N.J. — volunteered for the team effort to save the teenager from almost certain death. “It was John (Quattrochi) who raced over to help,” recalled Hayes, marking his 100th birthday earlier this week.

Landmarks attract those committing suicide

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From the Great Falls Tribune (in Great Falls. Minnesota):

Two suicide attempts at Niagara Falls last week have renewed an age-old worry about some of the nation’s most famous landmarks: such highly visible places are magnets for troubled people looking to end their lives.

Cities and states around the nation have tried to come up with ways to deter suicide attempts — officials at the Golden Gate Bridge installed crisis phones and hope to put in safety nets. The Empire State Building has already installed a net.

For depressed people who want their final act to be monumental, such landmarks are sought out because of their high visibility and notoriety, experts say.

The two separate suicide attempts at Niagara Falls left one man dead and another hospitalized after being pulled from the river.

The man who survived is in stable condition after plunging at least 180 feet Monday over the Canadian side of the falls.

He climbed a railing 20 to 30 feet out over the tallest of the three main falls and jumped into the river, according to witness accounts given to police.

He was pulled from the water by rescue workers and is only the third person known to have lived after going over the falls without a safety device.

A Timeline of Tragedy at Niagara Falls

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From Yahoo! News:

Niagara Falls is a quintessentially North American phenomenon. Situated at the border between America and Canada, the roaring force of nature has captured the imagination of those who visit for centuries. Actually a collection of three falls, they are dramatic but can bring the reckless side out of tourists and daredevils.

The latest victim went over Sunday, when a 19-year-old student visiting from Toronto lost her footing while climbing on a safety railing, plunged to the water below, then was swept over the falls. Following is a timeline of some of the other tragic events linked to the famous tourist destination.

Choose safety over a pretty picture

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From the Toronto Sun:

Why do people think it’s safe for their children to lean over the railing and tempt the Horseshoe Falls?

Just because it’s a great picture?

Just steps from where a teen went over Sunday, a little girl of 2 1/2 leaned over the edge of the falls Tuesday and laughed as the spray hit her face.

I have covered a lot of death; it just didn’t look safe to me. Just one slip here or a gust of wind there and who knows.

What if she decided to climb over this barrier? There would not be time to stop her.

Brink of Niagara Falls perfectly safe for spectators – as long as they follow the rules

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From Bullet News Niagara:

The steel railing and stone wall that divides tens of thousands of tourists from the beauty and power of Niagara Falls are almost always wet and slippery from the mist that routinely drifts out across the city.

But the obvious potential for danger, the signs warning people to keep their feet on the sidewalk, constant reminders from police patrolling the area around Table Rock – even with all of that, some people can’t resist tempting fate.

“We see it all the time,” said Niagara Parks Police Chief Doug Kane. “It’s very disturbing … very disturbing.”

So even on a breezy August Monday afternoon, with three incidents serving as fresh reminders of the dangerous and deadly consequences, there they were, visitors scaling the barrier at the brink of the falls, anxious for that apparent metre or two of added closeness to one of the world’s greatest wonders.

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