Tag: ontario superior court

    Marineland demonstrations will continue: MAD

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    From Niagara This Week:

    The co-founder of Marineland Animal Defense says demonstrations will continue, but they will be obeying new restrictions laid out by the court last week.

    Justice Richard Lococo imposed three several restrictions last Friday morning at the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in the case of Dylan Powell against Marineland Canada. The interim injunction provides a number of restrictions against protesters, including trespassing on Marineland property, the use of megaphones, usage of words such as “abuse”, “torture”, “criminal”, “animal abuse” and “arrest John Holer”, and more.

    Marineland sues former trainer Christine Santos for $1.25 million for Toronto Star article

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    From the Toronto Star:

    Marineland served a $1.25 million lawsuit against former trainer Christine Santos on Thursday for telling the Star a killer whale was sporadically bleeding from its tail.

    The suit says whale’s cuts were minor and that Santos knew that.

    “Ms. Santos’ communication of the (allegations) to the Star was calculated to disparage Marineland in its business,” said the 20-page statement of claim filed in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in St. Catharines.

    Send killer whale back to Florida, court tells Marineland

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    From the Toronto Star:

    Ontario’s Court of Appeal has upheld a lower court decision ordering Marineland to return a killer whale to the Florida water park that loaned it out.

    In July, an Ontario Superior Court judge ordered the Niagara Falls amusement park to return Ikaika, a 9-year-old male orca, to SeaWorld, the Orlando, Fla.-based owner.

    The initial ruling focused on legal technicalities surrounding the “breeding loan agreement” between the two parks.

    Marineland appealed the decision, but the appeals court echoed the sentiments of the previous ruling in rejecting its court challenge.

    “The breeding loan agreement is not a long term agreement. The maximum term of the loan of Ikaika is only four years and thereafter only a year at a time,” wrote Justice Stephen Goudge, on behalf of a three-member panel.

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