Tag: new york

    A visit to Prospect Point: Breathtaking views of Niagara Falls from state park

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    From NewYorkUpstate.com (includes many nice photos):

    It would be hard to be disappointed at the views from Prospect Point at Niagara Falls State Park, and that’s probably why more than 8 million people visit every year. The stunning view by day and by night can leave a visitor breathless and struggling for superlatives. You can walk out high over the Niagara River Gorge at the Prospect Point Observation Tower, or you can walk down to feel the spray coming off the Falls.

    Airbnb says home-sharing business is booming in Niagara Falls

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    From the Buffalo News:

    The private home-sharing economy is becoming a factor in the Niagara Falls tourism scene, though so far it’s made little dent in the hotel trade in the Cataract City.

    Since 2014, the number of Niagara Falls-area residents hosting tourists in their homes has quadrupled, and the number of tourists choosing to stay in homes instead of hotels is six times greater than three years ago.

    Airbnb, the leading home-sharing website, issued a report this week citing its success near Niagara Falls and other leading New York State parks.

    In Focus: Niagara Falls area, Ontario, Canada

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    From 4 Hoteliers:

    The city of Niagara Falls, Ontario, is on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls, which forms the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the US state of New York.

    The natural wonder of Niagara Falls, which is the collective name for the Horseshoe Falls, the adjacent American Falls, and the smaller Bridal Veil Falls, is a major tourist attraction for the city of Niagara Falls, attracting 12 million visitors every year.

    Combined, the three falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world—and a vertical drop of more than 165 feet.

    With a population of 85,810, the city offers direct “one-day” business opportunities to people on both sides of the border, along with multi-modal transportation networking that includes road, water, rail, and air.

    The gritty side of Niagara Falls

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    From Macleans:

    Hi I am Michelle Siu (@michellewsiu). I’m a documentary photographer and I am sharing a diptych project called “The Forgotten Dream” that I am grateful to have produced with a grant from The Economic Hardship Reporting Project (@economichardship) to document Niagara Falls, New York. Thanks for following along.

    There are a series of photos that documents a bit of how Niagara Falls, USA has struggled. I wasn’t terribly impressed with the photos or their captions. I don’t think they shed any light on much of what has happened there.

    Niagara Falls is both friendly and flashy

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    From the Tennessean (including photos):

    My first impression of Canada is that it’s flashy.”

    These were the words of my 12-year-old son crossing the bridge from New York to Niagara Falls, Ontario. This impression will prove short-lived for him and his two brothers, but if you make this journey at night, you can’t miss the urgent neon of the town’s casinos and resorts.

    No, guys, those aren’t the Northern Lights.

    Just as there are two major waterfalls in Niagara Falls (American Falls on the U.S. side and Canada’s Horseshoe Falls), there are two Niagara Falls communities, one on either side of the border.

    Niagara Falls, a US and Canadian jewel

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    From the Stillwater New Press:

    Spectacular Niagra Falls is a case study on international cooperation and agreement between two nations.

    Of course, those two countries are Canada, and our good ol’ U.S. of A.

    As the mighty Niagra River flows from the Great Lakes of Erie to Ontario, the incredible falls are created. The title Niagra Falls is actually a collective name for three separate waterfalls in the same general area. American Falls and Bridal Veil Falls are both located in New York state on the U.S. side, while massive Horseshoe Falls is located almost entirely in the Canadian province of Ontario. Even with two huge countries involved, both governments have interacted with each other on excellent terms over many, many years, and there is no reason to believe this mutual cooperation will not continue well into the future.

    Just say Yes: Hall of Famers headed to Niagara Falls

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    From the Buffalo News:

    Days after being inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, members of the legendary progressive rock enclave Yes have announced a date at the Seneca Niagara Casino.

    Though the group performed at the UB Center for the Arts last fall beneath the moniker Anderson Rabin & Wakeman, when Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman come back to the area on Oct. 7, they will be trading beneath the banner “Yes featuring Jon Anderson, Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman.”

    Looming casino revenue loss could hit Niagara Falls hard

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    From WIVB Channel 4 in Buffalo:

    “If we spend it now and it’s not there and this thing lasts for quite some time it can cause a lot of problems,” said Andrew Touma, Niagara Falls City Councilman.

    Touma is calling for a 90-day moratorium on casino revenue spending following the Seneca Nation’s announcement to discontinue payments to the state.

    “We collect about $16 million a year and of that money around $11 or $12 million per year is used in the general budget. Just to cover expenses in the general budget and then we use other monies for capital projects,” said Touma.

    Niagara Falls hotel owner may build another hotel next door

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    From the Buffalo News:

    The owners of the Wingate by Wyndham hotel in downtown Niagara Falls have acquired the neighboring lot and may build another hotel there. Read More…

    HIGGS: Early tourism took visitors below and behind the falls

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    From the Niagara Gazette:

    Since Franciscan monk and explorer Louis Hennepin became the first European to encounter the “Falls at Niagara” in 1658 we could call him the first “tourist,” but let’s start in the early 19th century. We will begin around the time of the construction of the Erie Canal on July 4, 1817 in Rome, New York, which opened the door to travel (and commerce) across the state of New York. Read More…

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