Tag: history

Arcade review and history: Skyquest Arcade at the Basement of the Skylon Tower, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada

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I recently posted a couple of things about the Skylon Tower. Apparently the arcade on the lower level (basement?) has some old/retro, and consequently, rare games.

Commentor @SaraAB87 let me know that she wrote a blog post for the Arcade Heroes website. If you are interested in a bit of the history of the Skylon Tower arcade, or if you like games in general, you can read about it here

The hidden history of Niagara Falls

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From WIVB channel 4 in Buffalo:

In Niagara Falls, historians and members of the community are working together to uncover the hidden history of the Underground Railroad in the Cataract City. Read More…

Prediction: SNOW from January to April at Niagara Falls History Museum

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Last week I received the following press release from the Niagara Falls History Museum:

For Immediate Release

Prediction: SNOW from January to April at
Niagara Falls History Museum

Niagara Falls, ON, January 13, 2016 – Canadians have a long-standing fascination with snow.  We either love it or hate it, and sometimes we do both.  We adapt to it, use it, have fun with it, identify with it, and are inspired by it.  Snow is an interactive exhibition opening at the Niagara Falls History Museum on January 26, 2017.

Snow, the first exhibition of its kind in Canada, portrays the amazing love-hate relationship that the inhabitants of this great land have had with snow since the arrival of the First Peoples in North America. Created by the Canadian Museum of History in partnership with the J. Armand Bombardier Museum, Snow gives visitors a historical and cultural perspective on this element of nature as a source of adaptation, passion, ingenuity and creativity.

With over 400 digital photos and captions contributed by Canadians from across the country, Snow gives visitors a true feel for winter.  Snow presents artefacts such as boots made out of sealskin and caribou hide, snowshoes and clothing designed to be warm and waterproof.   Eyeglasses made from walrus ivory by Nunavut’s Thule Inuit that date back to around 1300 are among the items on display.   Visitors young and old can try on replicas of the glasses and see some of the clever ways in which humans have adapted to snow and cold.  Among the exhibition’s interactives are opportunities to try on a snowshoeing outfit, listen to recorded stories and view sketches made by explorers, voyageurs, soldiers and scientists, to learn how Canada’s early settlers endured and adapted to the winter months.

“Weather is a favourite topic for Canadians,” says Suzanne Moase, Niagara Falls Museums Curator.  “We love to talk about snowstorms, the cold and the slush.  Snow, the exhibition, will strike a chord with all our visitors, from outdoor enthusiasts to sitters by the fire and everyone in between.  The artefacts and documents chosen represent how we deal with the challenge of snowy winters today, as well as how we have coped with snow and adapted our lifestyles around it in the past.”

Media are invited to preview the exhibition on January 25 from 5:00 p.m until 7:00 p.m. where Museum staff and Mr. Nicolas Gauvin, Director of Business Partnerships and Information Management at the Canadian Museum of History will be available for comments.

Snow falls on the Niagara Falls History Museum, 5810 Ferry Street, Niagara Falls, on January 26 and “blankets” the Ontario Power Generation Gallery until April 16, 2017.  Come and see how snow has helped shape our cultural identity.  You’ll be “snowed” under.

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For more information, contact:

Clark Bernat, City of Niagara Falls
Manager of Museums and Culture

Phone: 905-358-5082
Email: cbernat@niagarafalls.ca

HIGGS: Before Niagara Falls was a city

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From the Niagara Gazette:

What was life like in the early days of the Niagara area — even before it was a fully fledged city? I hope you are somewhat interested as I am part of the planning committee for the Niagara Falls 125th celebration and will be writing about the early days in Niagara Falls each week.

Mayor Paul Dyster will be holding a press conference this Wednesday to announce some of the plans. We have a long and colorful history and we can always learn from it. There will be various events which will highlight our history throughout the year and I hope you will be a part of them…

Old newspapers are the main source of my research and the Niagara Falls Gazette was publishing during these times and I have online sources to refer to also. Of course, the Local History Department at the Main Street library is also a great source for information. So let’s begin “before” we were a “city.”

Unknown Stories of WNY: Tesla’s Niagara Legacy

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From WGRZ Channel 2 in Buffalo (includes video):

As Dan Davis, Joan Johnson and Lewis Buttery sit in the cafe at the Niagara Arts Culture Center, they discuss Niagara Falls history, and how it could mean big things for the future of the Cataract City. As members of the group Tesla at Niagara, they envision the famous inventor’s creation energizing tourists of the future.

The group is trying to establish a museum dedicated to the work of Nikola Tesla and the Niagara Falls Power Company.

ZAVITZ: Aero car has had an ‘exhilarating’ century

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From the Niagara Falls Review:

It was like a sunny island in the midst of gloomy seas — a happy news story at a time when most of the news, especially if it came from the European war front, was decidedly depressing.

That “happy” story was on the front page of The Niagara Falls Review for Wednesday, Aug. 9, 1916. The headline read “Aero Cableway Opened Yesterday.”

Now known as the Whirlpool Aero Car, this popular Niagara Parks attraction is about to celebrate its centennial. Over the past century millions of people have been treated to a bird’s-eye view of the mighty whirlpool as they glided across six cables, some 75 metres above that turbulent watery spectacle.

Maid of the Mist burned in 1955

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As I was moving the AccessNiagara.com web site, I came across this old newspaper scan. I can’t remember at all where I got it from, but it highlights the historical event of when a couple of the Maid of the Mist boats had a fire. It happened in 1955, and the photo/article mentions it was the 50th anniversary, so I assume this is from 2005.
19550422_motm_burned

ZAVITZ: Amazing 1939 discoveries made at Niagara forts

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From the Niagara Falls Review:

While recently reading some Niagara news from 1939 (yes, 1939), I came across some interesting items that I would like to share with you. All concern some sort of discovery.

During the spring and summer of that year work was progressing on the restoration of Old Fort Erie which, of course, had played a major role during the War of 1812.

In late May 1939, a startling find took place when the skeletons of nearly a hundred British soldiers were discovered lying in eight large wooden boxes buried in a shallow trench. The press account of the discovery noted, “In some places the bodies were found lying three deep. Among their bones in some cases were the actual musket balls that had struck them.”

The story behind this discovery is both dramatic and tragic.

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