Tag: france

    Boom Days gets fired up in the Falls

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    From the Niagara Gazette:

    The cannon will fire again for LaSalle, Hennepin & Company at the 12th annual Niagara Falls Boom Days set for 7 p.m. on Saturday.

    This date will mark the 125th anniversary of the formation of the City of Niagara Falls, completed when the Town of LaSalle incorporated itself to the city in 1927, but Boom Days has an older tradition in which it honors Cavalier LaSalle and Father Hennepin who opened the fur trade up for the France and crossed the Great Lakes to Wisconsin in 1679 from Griffin Park Boat Locks.

    In full costume, Kenneth Sherman will play the explorer LaSalle while Walter Kendzia plays Father Hennepin, and both will paddle from Griffon Park Boat Locks to the LaSalle Yacht Club with any would-be companions.

    Vandals strike WFOL display

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    From Niagara This Week:

    One of the more recent illuminations added to the Ontario Power Generation Festival of Lights is now dark.

    It’s all thanks to an act of vandalism which occurred sometime between midnight on Jan. 15 and 5 p.m. Jan. 16. That’s when an individual or a group caused substantial damage to the Sylma display at Dufferin Islands. The arched lighting display came from France, according to Winter Festival of Lights (WFOL) executive director Tina Myers.

    Le visage caché des Chutes du Niagara (The Hidden Face of Niagara Falls)

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    From Le Parisien:

    Découvrir les Chutes du Niagara sous un autre angle.

    On connaît l’image des Chutes du Niagara, ces impressionnants murs d’eau en forme de fer à cheval où la rivière Niagara effectue un saut de 51 mètres dans le vide. C’est en été que le spectacle est le plus impressionnant. Mais on oublie souvent que le site est tout aussi magique en hiver. Au plus fort de l’hiver, les chutes deviennent des sculptures de glace que l’on peut admirer jusqu’au dégel.

    Translation courtesy of Google Translate:

    Discover the Niagara Falls from a different angle.

    We know the image of Niagara Falls, the impressive horseshoe-shaped water walls where the Niagara River jumps 51 meters in a vacuum. It is in summer that the show is most impressive. But we often forget that the site is just as magical in winter. At the height of winter, the falls become sculptures of ice that can be admired until the thaw.

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