Tag: flow

Turning Off Niagara Falls Could Reveal Geological Secrets

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This is kind of old news, but it has a nice perspective of what might be found if the water stops flowing at Niagara Falls.

From LiveScience.com:

or the first time in nearly 50 years, officials are debating turning off the tap for part of Niagara Falls.

Officials have proposed drying out two of the three waterfalls that make up Niagara Falls — American Falls and Bridal Veil Falls — so that workers can repair the aging pedestrian bridges that span the rapids along the river that feeds the falls. (Horseshoe Falls is the third waterfall that makes up Niagara.) The proposed “dewatering” would do more than provide the curious with a rare chance to see the landscape transformed. It could also yield unprecedented insights into the rock-cutting process that is hidden beneath the flow of millions of gallons of water.

Niagara Falls are “very spectacular aesthetically, but they’re not studied a lot geologically,” said Marcus Bursik, a geologist with the University at Buffalo, who is proposing to measure some of the changes in the falls if the water is cut off. The new plan could provide a one-time chance to do some of that geological research, he added.

In Focus: Niagara Falls area, Ontario, Canada

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From 4 Hoteliers:

The city of Niagara Falls, Ontario, is on the Canadian side of Niagara Falls, which forms the international border between the Canadian province of Ontario and the US state of New York.

The natural wonder of Niagara Falls, which is the collective name for the Horseshoe Falls, the adjacent American Falls, and the smaller Bridal Veil Falls, is a major tourist attraction for the city of Niagara Falls, attracting 12 million visitors every year.

Combined, the three falls have the highest flow rate of any waterfall in the world—and a vertical drop of more than 165 feet.

With a population of 85,810, the city offers direct “one-day” business opportunities to people on both sides of the border, along with multi-modal transportation networking that includes road, water, rail, and air.

Lake Erie-Niagara River ice boom installation planned to begin

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From Niagara Frontier Publications (from last Friday):

Placement of the 22 spans of the Lake Erie-Niagara River ice boom is about to start.

Each winter since 1964, the Lake Erie-Niagara River ice boom has been installed near the outlet of Lake Erie to reduce the amount of ice entering the Niagara River. Reduction in ice entering the river reduces the potential for ice jams, which can result in damage to shoreline property and significantly reduce water flow for hydroelectric power production.

Under the International Joint Commission’s 1999 Supplementary Order of Approval, placement of the spans may begin when the Lake Erie water temperature at Buffalo reaches 4ºC (39ºF) or on Dec. 16, whichever comes first. Installation of the ice boom is planned to begin today, weather permitting.

American side of Niagara Falls to go silent

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From North Country Public Radio:

Parks officials in New York are planning a project of historic significance: temporarily shutting off the American Falls. That will dramatically alter a natural wonder that attracts millions of tourists from around the world.

The Niagara Falls State Park project is designed to replace two pedestrian bridges that are over 100 years old. Those bridges connect the main section of the park to Goat Island, which splits the Niagara River into two falls, one in Canada and the other in the U.S.

Shutting off the flow of the river and the falls will give construction workers access to the bridge supports.

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