Tag: breeding loan agreement

    Send killer whale back to Florida, court tells Marineland

    No Comments

    From the Toronto Star:

    Ontario’s Court of Appeal has upheld a lower court decision ordering Marineland to return a killer whale to the Florida water park that loaned it out.

    In July, an Ontario Superior Court judge ordered the Niagara Falls amusement park to return Ikaika, a 9-year-old male orca, to SeaWorld, the Orlando, Fla.-based owner.

    The initial ruling focused on legal technicalities surrounding the “breeding loan agreement” between the two parks.

    Marineland appealed the decision, but the appeals court echoed the sentiments of the previous ruling in rejecting its court challenge.

    “The breeding loan agreement is not a long term agreement. The maximum term of the loan of Ikaika is only four years and thereafter only a year at a time,” wrote Justice Stephen Goudge, on behalf of a three-member panel.

    Custody of killer whale plays out in court

    No Comments

    Another great article about the Marinlenad/SeaWorld court case, this time from the Toronto Star:

    Ikaika, an eight-year-old male killer whale at Marineland in Niagara Falls, is the equivalent of a troubled teenager. He is full of sexual energy, has a violent family tree and a pattern of aggressive behaviour that often leaves him swimming alone. Even so, two marine parks are waging a cross-border court battle for custody of the valuable orca.

    A St. Catharines judge recently ruled he be returned to SeaWorld in Orlando, Fla., where he was born in August 2002. The judge’s ruling focused on legal technicalities surrounding the “breeding loan agreement” between the two parks.

    Neither side is speaking on the matter publicly — both declined interviews with the Toronto Star — due to the pending appeal. Marineland repeatedly declined to comment on advice of their lawyers.

    “We stand by our filings in the court record,” said Fred Jacobs, vice-president of communications for SeaWorld, in an email.

    The court files, however, provide a rare glimpse into the dealings of the marine park community, which is notoriously private.

    %d bloggers like this: